How the italian states differed from other states during the renaissance

Italy in the Mid-Fourteenth Century: Commerce enriched and empowered regions in which the feudal system had not taken a strong hold, especially in northern Italy.

How the italian states differed from other states during the renaissance

At the end of the Middle Ages, Italian towns grew into independent city-states, governing themselves and the surrounding country. Spurred by overseas trade, these city states began to grow and huge fortunes were made by Italian merchants and bankers. Wealthy families, such as the de Medicis of Florence, began to rule these city states.

The independence of these city states allowed There are several important differences between the Italian Renaissance and that of Northern Europe. The independence of these city states allowed these rulers to experiment in government and in the world of ideas. The wealth of these ruling families allowed them to sponsor artists and writers and pay for statues and new buildings.

In contrast, the Northern Renaissance developed differently. The traditions of chivalry and knighthood were stronger there. Therefore, in Northern Europe, it was nobles and royalty that had the most power and money.

Kings, queens and nobles were patrons of the arts there as opposed to wealthy merchant and banking families in Italy. Learning in Northern Europe centered around royal courts, not the homes of great families. In Italy, the work of the artists, writers and architects that were sponsored by these wealthy ruling families reflected the ideas of humanism.

Humanists took an interest in the classical writing and admired the classical culture of ancient Greeks and Romans and stressed the importance of the individual.

From the SparkNotes Blog

It emphasized classical learning and human potential and achievements. Northern Humanism differed from Italian humanism. Northern Europe had fewer large towns which could act as cultural centers, so the church played a more active role in the Northern Renaissance.

Northern humanists stressed the importance of spiritual life more than the Italians. Though Northern humanists studied the classical works of Greece and Rome, they also learned the Greek and Hebrew language in order to carefully study the writings and thoughts of early Christians.

Artistic styles also differed. In the North, oil based paints were used which dried more slowly allowing colors to be mixed more easily creating newer, more subtle shades.Italian city-states conducted their own trade, collected their own taxes, and made their own laws.

Some city-states, such as Florence, were governed by an elected council. During the Renaissance groups of guild members, called boards, often ruled Italian city-states.

How the italian states differed from other states during the renaissance

Caption - The Italian Peninsula was divided into a number of city-states during the Renaissance period. The beginnings of the Renaissance The Renaissance (in Italian, il Rinascimento) began in the northern city-states of Italy in the early 14th century and gradually spread throughout Western Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries.

The Renaissance Italy was divided into numerous city-states. The most important and popular city-states of Renaissance Italy were Florence, Milan, Venice and Rome.[1] Rulers in Florence and other city-states were influenced by powerful and wealthy families, many city-states were competitive and wars among the city-states were common.

During the warfare in Italy, however, states began to send resident diplomats to other small states in order to share information. This practice soon spread throughout Europe birthing the modern system of diplomacy whereby ambassadors first and foremost serve . What contributed to the rise of the Italian states during the Renaissance were the following: thriving trade, no central power, and struggle for 5/5(1).

Italian city-states conducted their own trade, collected their own taxes, and made their own laws. Some city-states, such as Florence, were governed by an elected council. During the Renaissance groups of guild members, called . Italian city-states conducted their own trade, collected their own taxes, and made their own laws. Some city-states, such as Florence, were governed by an elected council. During the Renaissance groups of guild members, called boards, often ruled Italian city-states. Caption - The Italian Peninsula was divided into a number of city-states during the Renaissance period. The beginnings of the Renaissance The Renaissance (in Italian, il Rinascimento) began in the northern city-states of Italy in the early 14th century and gradually spread throughout Western Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries.

The other first Italian city-states to appear in northern Italy arose as a result of a struggle to gain greater autonomy when not independent from the German Holy Roman Empire.

Quiz: Renaissance - Italian City-States